View Saved Passwords with This One Easy Trick

If you’ve used a web browser on a laptop or desktop computer, chances are you have been prompted to save your password when logging into a website site for the first time. It’s a convenient tool when browsing because as we all know, there are so many passwords to remember. But what happens if you saved a password a long time ago and can’t remember it? Good news! In all the popular browsers (Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Microsoft Edge), there is an easy way to reveal these saved passwords. Security note: if you are saving passwords in a browser on a shared computer, others may also be able to access these passwords using this method.

Firefox

In Firefox, click on the three lines in the top right corner, to the right of the address bar, and then click Passwords.

Screenshot showing Firefox preferences menu

You’ll see a list of all your saved passwords. If you have a large number of saved passwords, you can also search for a specific site in the top search box. Each entry will have the website where your password was saved, along with the username, if applicable. Clicking on one of the entries will give you more details.

Screenshot showing Firefox password manager.

You can see the website in bold. Clicking on edit will allow you to change the username and/or password associated with that site. If you want to delete this saved password, click on remove. You can copy both the username and password. To reveal the saved password, click on the eye icon next to the password field. You also have details about when the saved entry was created, modified, and last used. If you make any changes, click on the save changes button, which will appear if you click edit.

Google Chrome

In the Google Chrome browser, click on the three dots in the top right corner, and then click on settings.

Screenshot showing Chrome menu to access settings.

Next, click on Autofill on the left, and then Password Manager.

Screenshot showing how to access password manager in Chrome

On the next screen, you’ll see your list of passwords. There is the option to search to find a specific password. You can also turn off Chrome prompting you to save passwords by clicking the blue button next to Offer to save passwords. Chrome also gives you the option to automatically sign in using saved credentials. Clicking check passwords will allow you to see if Chrome considers your passwords weak and to see if your password has been compromised in a data breach.

Screenshot showing Chrome's password manager.

Under Saved Passwords, you will see the website, username, and password. To reveal the password, click the eye icon. With Chrome, you will be prompted to enter the password you use to sign into Windows or Mac as an extra layer of security. Clicking on the three dots will give you the option to change, edit, or remove that particular saved password. Chrome will autosave any changes you make on this screen. You can add a new saved password by clicking the add button. You can import or export your list of saved passwords by clicking the three dots next to the Add button.

Safari (Mac/Apple Browser)

In Safari, click on Safari in bold on the top taskbar, and then click Preferences.

Screenshot showing menu to access Safari preferences.

Next, click on the Passwords tab. You will be prompted to enter the password you use to sign onto your Mac at startup as an extra layer of security.

Screenshot showing Safari's password manager.

From here, you will see your list of passwords on the left. If you click on a particular entry in the list, you will see the website URL, when it was modified, the user name, and the password.

To view the saved password, move your mouse pointer over the black dots in the password field. You can also see it by clicking the edit button. Clicking the edit button will also allow you to edit the password or remove it. Clicking the share icon will allow you to share the password via AirDrop if another Apple user is nearby.

Additionally, if you click on the website name in the list on the left, you can click the minus button on the bottom to delete the password. Clicking the plus icon will allow you to add a new website and saved password. If the Detect compromised passwords option is checked, when you click on a particular entry and there are issues with the password, you will see a message that says “easily guessed password” or “compromised password.” Compromised password means that particular password has appeared in a data leak, which puts that account at high risk of compromise.

Edge (Microsoft Windows browser)

The Edge browser in Windows uses an icon that looks like this:

Image of Edge browser icon.

The website How-To Geek has written up some great instructions on how to view your saved passwords in Edge.

Have you tried out any of the methods described above to view a saved password? Let us know in the comments!

Has Tech-Talk Improved Your Tech Skills Yet?

The East Greenbush Library provides technology help in a variety of formats. We conduct classes, offer one-on-one assistance by appointment, post help videos, and have a page dedicated to online help articles and videos gathered from vetted websites around the internet. Did you know we also have a subscription resource available to our patrons with great articles, videos, and webinars for users of all skill levels? Whether you’re a technology pro or you’re just getting started, Tech-Talk has something for everyone.

While we’ve featured Tech-Talk and some of their articles before, this time we’ve made a quick video to highlight how to find what you are looking for in Tech-Talk. Can’t find what you’re looking for? You can submit requests for future articles and videos on whatever tech topic you need.

If you’d like to receive a weekly quick tip from Tech-Talk in your inbox, along with information about upcoming webinars, sign up for the Tech-Talk newsletter on the main page.

Have you tried Tech-Talk yet? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Using Canva for Video

Our last post highlighted Snagit as an image and video editing tool, so we thought we’d highlight another popular graphic editing tool – Canva. You may have used Canva as an image editing tool, but did you know it can also edit videos?

If you aren’t familiar with Canva, you may want to start with this introductory webinar and article to get an overview.

The Canva: Getting Started webinar goes into more detail about Canva basics and starting a design from scratch.

The next video/article in the series, Canva: Graphic Design, focuses on more advanced concepts to make eye-catching designs and collaborate with teams.

When you are comfortable creating and editing still images, you can dive into the new video-creation features Canva has to offer intermediate users. Tech-Talk created two webinars about creating video in Canva:

Have you tried making videos in Canva? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

Email Scams Part 2 – 4 Ways to Protect Your Computer and Files

In an earlier post, we highlighted a Tech-Talk article with tips for identifying scam emails. Beyond being careful about clicking a link in a questionable email, there are some things you can do right now to protect your computer from becoming compromised in the event a scam evades detection.

One thing you can do is to make sure your device’s operating system and its apps/software are up-to-date. This means actions like performing Windows Updates when prompted or checking the app store to make sure your apps are all updated to the latest version.

For more tips on securing your computer and files from scams, check out this Tech-Talk article and video. If you have questions about how to use any of these tips, please let us know in the comments or contact the Reference Desk at the library, 518-477-7476, option 5.

Dump the Literal Approach to Images

Images do a great job of helping written ideas to be understood. Often, writers search for an image that literally depicts they subject they are discussing. However, an image that directly shows your subject may not be as engaging as one that simply reinforces the idea of what you are writing about.

To learn more, check out this Tech-Talk article about thinking outside the box when choosing images to pair with written content. If you are prompted for a username and password, both are eglibrary.